Posts Currently viewing the tag: "Oregon"
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Last week, a federal court ruled that the International Longshore Workers Union (ILWU) bosses are guilty of engaging in “illegal work slowdowns in 2012 and 2013, potentially exposing the union to millions of dollars in damage payments.” As a consequence of ILWU kingpins’ lawlessness and intransigence, according to Journal of Commerce Senior Editor Bill Mongelluzzo…(Read More)

Oregon’s three largest public sector unions spentmore than $2.3 million in forced-dues money to elect hand-picked candidates, and sway ballot initiatives.  And that was just in the past two months.  Hannah Hoffman has the story in the Statesman Journal. The unions collectively oppose Measure 90, which would allow for an open…(Read More)

The National Labor Relations Board has found the International Longshore and Warehouse Union (ILWU) guilty of intentional slowdowns at the Port of Portland.   Joseph Rose has the story at the Oregonian. The 18-page decision, (PDF) written by administrative law judge Jeffrey D. Wedekind in San Francisco, orders ILWU and its Local 8 and Local…(Read More)

Authorities are investigating allegatons of threats and violence to workers as well as their children, in a year-long strike filled with violence and threats.  Richard Read has the story on Oregonlive.com The National Labor Relations Board accused longshoremen this week of assaulting United Grain Corp. security officers and threatening to rape a manager…(Read More)

As Right to Work initiatives gain momentum, union bosses and their allies use forced dues to keep workers in chains.  Trey Kovacs has the story in workplacechoice.org. States considering adopting right-to-work legislation include Missouri, Ohio, and Oregon. In those states, right-to-work could be on the statewide ballot as soon as…(Read More)

Under Oregon labor law provisions authorizing monopoly bargaining in government workplaces, public employees who don’t wish to join a union are forced to allow union officials to negotiate with their employer over their pay, benefits, and working conditions.  They are prohibited from negotiating on their own behalf. There is no exception if the employer…(Read More)

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