Federally-Imposed Forced Union Dues Are Unconstitutional

On February 10, 2016, in NILRR Research, by Stan Greer

More than 70 years ago, when Steele v. Louisville & Nashville Railroad came before the U.S. Supreme Court, there was no federal law prohibiting race-based job discrimination perpetrated by employers or other private parties. As a consequence, the railroad executives who were the principal defendants in this case were able to contend that a racially discriminatory […]

Lawmakers Should Respect Raisin Farmers’, and Workers’, Economic Liberty

On January 24, 2015, in News Clips, by Stan Greer

During the Great Depression, the U.S. Congress enacted many laws intended to foster economic recovery by restricting marketplace competition.  Today, there is a wide consensus among historians, economists, and political scientists, including many who support the New Deal on the whole, that these anti-competition statutes were ill-advised and counterproductive. One striking recent illustration of the […]

Federal Labor Law Is Anti-Free Speech

On December 25, 2013, in NILRR Research, by Stan Greer

Imagine that you live in a small town whose mayor frequently schedules public meetings in which she shares information about local affairs with constituents and solicits their input.  You regularly attend such meetings and sometimes offer an opinion or two about matters of public concern. Now imagine that on Election Day, the mayor wins another […]

Big Labor Academic Wants to Have It Both Ways With Workplace ‘Majority Rule’

On August 24, 2013, in NILRR Research, Right To Work, by Stan Greer

Charles J. Morris on Labor Relations For a decade or more, Charles J. Morris, professor emeritus at Southern Methodist University’s Dedman School of Law and a lifelong cheerleader for monopolistic unionism, has been crusading for the expansion of “members-only bargaining” as a means for union officials who are seeking monopoly-bargaining privileges at a workplace to […]

Competition’s Good For Raisin Farmers, and For Employees as Well

On July 22, 2013, in News Clips, Right To Work, by Stan Greer

Congress should reexamine raisin marketing law During the Great Depression, the U.S. Congress enacted many laws intended to foster economic recovery by restricting marketplace competition.  Today there is a wide consensus among historians, economists, and political scientists, including many who support the New Deal on the whole, that these anti-competition statutes were ill-advised and counterproductive. […]

Immunity From ID Theft Laws – Another Court-Created Special Privilege For Big Labor?

On February 22, 2013, in Fact Sheets, by NILRR Staff

Court Rules Union Bosses Can Ignore Identity Theft Laws To Intimidate Employees (Click here to download Fact Sheet) Over the course of the past century, American elected officials and judges have handed to Big Labor an array of special privileges and immunities that would be unimaginable for any other type of private organization. The U.S. Congress started […]

‘Shroom Producers Get 1st Amendment Rights, not U.S. employees

On July 20, 2012, in Fact Sheets, News Clips, by NILRR Staff

First Amendment Equally Protects Rights of Independent-Minded Workers, Business Owners  Dissenting Workers Should Be Free to Refuse to Bankroll ‘Messages . . . Favored by a Majority’   (Download Fact Sheet) Last month, in his majority opinion in Knox v. Service Employees International Union Local 1000, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sam Alito observed that, in virtually all cases concerning private organizations other than labor […]

Labor Emancipation No Imposition on States’ Rights

On July 11, 2012, in News Clips, by NILRR Staff

FACT SHEET July 6, 2012 ‘Freedom Rests on Choice, and Where Choice Is Denied Freedom Is Destroyed as Well’ (Download .pdf file click here) S.2173 and H.R.2040, the National Right to Work Act, would not add a single word to federal labor law.  This legislation would simply repeal all sections of the National Labor Relations […]