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The National Institute for Labor Relations Research senior research associate Stan Greer recently published some of his findings at CNSNews.  According to Mr. Greer, aggregate employment growth in the 22 states that had still not adopted Right to Work legislation as of the end of last year grew by less than half the Right to…(Read More)

The “gig economy” is often driven by new mobile apps that empower individual entrepreneurs such as independent Uber and Lyft Drivers. But Seattle city bosses have teamed up with their union-boss friends to put the squeeze on these entrepreneurs. They passed a city ordinance to force Uber and Lyft drivers to pay union dues…(Read More)

Drawing on multi-year data collected and reported by the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics and Occupational Safety and Health Administration, the Indiana Department of Labor (IDOL) recently pointed out that the rate of workplaces injuries and illnesses is now at an all-time low in the Hoosier State: At 3.5 injuries or illnesses…(Read More)

One important reason why living standards in Indiana have improved relative to in forced-unionism states nationwide since the Hoosier Right to Work law was adopted in early 2012 is the relative reduction in Indianans’ cost of living from 2012 to 2016. In an op-ed published last weekend by the Columbia (Mo.) Tribune (see…(Read More)

In a recent commentary for the Conservative News Service, I explain how union propagandists  routinely misrepresent U.S. Supreme Court and other federal court decisions concerning the “duty of fair representation.”  Led by the High Court, the judiciary has recognized that, whenever union bosses obtain monopoly power to represent all employees in a “bargaining unit…(Read More)

The U.S. Labor Department’s Employee Benefits Security Administration keeps track of “Critical and Declining, Critical, and Endangered” multiemployer pension funds. During 2016, 86 of these labor union dominated plans were in Critical Declining Status, 168 were in Critical Status, and 98 were in Endangered Status.[i] Critical and declining status has ballooned since…(Read More)

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